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In a gene tied to growth, scientists see glimmers of human history

A new study delves into the evolution and function of the human growth hormone receptor gene, and asks what forces in humanity's past may have driven changes to this vital piece of DNA......»»

Category: topSource:  physorgSep 24th, 2021

Luxo, Jr. and Mystique inspire novel approaches to shapeshifting materials

Two new papers highlight promising methods for making shapeshifting structures. Enlarge / Harvard scientists built "Totimorphic" structural materials that can adopt and maintain any possible shape. Scientists at Case Western Reserve Un.....»»

Category: topSource:  arstechnicaRelated News9 hr. 48 min. ago

If you ever wanted to help find new planets, now’s your chance

Scientists ask the public for help in figuring out which signals are real. Enlarge / The telescope array of the Next Generation Transit Survey. (credit: NGTS) If you've ever wanted to search for distant worlds, your time has c.....»»

Category: topSource:  arstechnicaRelated News10 hr. 16 min. ago

Zooniverse wants to turn you into a planet hunter

Scientists ask the public for help in figuring out which signals are real. Enlarge / The telescope array of the Next Generation Transit Survey. (credit: NGTS) If you've ever wanted to search for distant worlds, your time has c.....»»

Category: topSource:  arstechnicaRelated News11 hr. 16 min. ago

A national network examining Earth"s planetary limits

University of California San Diego Physics Professor Tom Murphy is among five authors of an essay, appearing in the November 2021 issue of the journal Energy Research & Social Science, that cautions current levels of worldwide economic growth, energy.....»»

Category: topSource:  pcmagRelated News13 hr. 16 min. ago

Chemists discover mechanism in controlled growth of tetrahedron-shaped nanoparticles

Nature clearly likes symmetry. Look at your own hands, for example. But sometimes nature produces asymmetric things, and the reasons aren't always clear......»»

Category: topSource:  pcmagRelated News13 hr. 16 min. ago

Discovery of ancient Peruvian burial tombs sheds new light on Wari culture

A team of archeologists in northern Peru discovered the remains of 29 people, including three children, that could help experts rewrite the history of the pre-Incan Wari civilization, the lead researcher said on Friday......»»

Category: topSource:  pcmagRelated News13 hr. 16 min. ago

The climate project that changed how we understand extreme weather

When a handful of scientists tried to publish rapid research into the role of climate change in record rainfall that lashed Britain in 2015, they were told their high-speed approach was "not science"......»»

Category: topSource:  pcmagRelated News13 hr. 16 min. ago

Apple Mac shipments grew 11% in Q3 2021, driven by M1

Apple's shipments of Mac computers grew 11% year-over-year in the third quarter of 2021, driven largely by demand for the company's new M1 models, while total PC growth appears to be contractingCredit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider Read more........»»

Category: appleSource:  appleinsiderRelated News13 hr. 48 min. ago

Inspirational Black figures in gaming and technology

To celebrate UK Black History Month, we're celebrating four Black figures who have made an impact on gaming and tech......»»

Category: topSource:  informationweekRelated News16 hr. 16 min. ago

Microorganisms are sensitive to large-scale climate change in Antarctica

For a long time, scientists assumed that microorganisms, due to their broad distribution patterns, were much less affected by such climatic changes than plants and animals that often present very limited distribution areas. By examining fossils of An.....»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated News20 hr. 48 min. ago

Scientists uncover the genetic pathway that colors bumble bee stripes

While most people in the U.S. may think of bumble bees as the standard yellow and black variety, there are an estimated 260 bee species that sport about 400 different color patterns. One reason many people associate bumble bees with distinct colors i.....»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated News20 hr. 48 min. ago

A comprehensive rental platform that greatly reduces operating costs of rental management companies

Southeast Asia, which has been experiencing rapid economic growth in recent years, has become a popular real estate investment target for foreign investors. With the high housing prices of today and changes to personal finance concepts, the number of.....»»

Category: itSource:  digitimesRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2021

Supply-side factors may constrain 5G smartphone shipment growth in 2022

Supply-side factors, including particulary shortages of power management IC (PMIC) and other components as well as power cuts in China, are very likely to constrain the overall 5G smartphone shipment growth in 2022 after affecting global smartphone s.....»»

Category: itSource:  digitimesRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2021

Best Maker Schools: University of Maryland

Makerspaces are becoming a fixture on college and university campuses. In fact, there are often multiple makerspaces on campus. At the University of Maryland, College Park, the growth of makerspaces followed a pattern I’ve seen elsewhere. Stud.....»»

Category: gadgetSource:  makezineonlineRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2021

When and why did human brains decrease in size 3,000 years ago? Ants may hold clues

The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. Now, a new study has brought us closer to understanding some of its evolution. It shows that human brains decreased in size approximately 3,000 years ago. By studying ants as models to illustrate.....»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2021

Steak Knife Made From Hardened Wood Is Three Times Sharper Than Steel

Scientists have used a new form of hardened wood to create a steak knife that is nearly three times sharper than a stainless steel dinner table knife. It can even be washed in the dishwasher! New Atlas reports: This hardy new form of wood is the hand.....»»

Category: topSource:  slashdotRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2021

How a deadly land fungus began killing marine mammals in the Salish Sea

In the early 2000s, a fungus infected hundreds of animals and people in British Columbia and Washington State. Scientists found that the disease also killed porpoises and dolphins in the Salish Sea—perhaps affecting cetaceans even earlier than peop.....»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated NewsOct 21st, 2021

Owl unseen for 150 years has been photographed in the wild for the first time

British scientists working in Ghana have rediscovered a "holy grail" giant owl that has lurked almost unseen in African rainforests for 150 years......»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated NewsOct 21st, 2021

Biodiversity of islands worldwide is in peril, scientists warn

Scientists are sounding the alarm. The biodiversity of islands around the world is becoming increasingly threatened, due in large part to habitat loss, overexploitation, invasive species and climate change. If healthy island environments are to be co.....»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated NewsOct 21st, 2021

The next big thing: How do scientists bring hydrogen fuel cells from the laboratory to public life?

Fuel cells, due to their high efficiency and environment-friendly attributes in the process of electricity generation, are gaining popularity for Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV) production, such as automobiles, forklifts, buses and airplanes. However, the co.....»»

Category: topSource:  physorgRelated NewsOct 21st, 2021