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Isolated Greek villages reveal genetic secrets that protect against heart disease

A genetic variant that protects the heart against cardiovascular disease has been discovered. The cardioprotective variant was found in an isolated Greek population, who are known to live long and healthy lives despite having a diet rich in animal fa.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 26th, 2017Related News

Diesel pollution linked to heart damage

Diesel pollution is linked with heart damage, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 26th, 2017Related News

Bioelectricity new weapon to fight dangerous infection

Changing natural electrical signaling in non-neural cells improves innate immune response to bacterial infections and injury. Tadpoles that received therapeutics, including those used in humans for other purposes, which depolarized their cells had hi.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 26th, 2017Related News

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

Researchers invented a Compton camera of 580g which visualizes gamma rays of arbitrary energies, and succeeded in achieving a high-resolution, multicolor 3-D molecular image of a live mouse administered with three different radioactive tracers in jus.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Using a genetic signature to overcome chemotherapy-resistant lung cancer

Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often respond to standard chemotherapy, only to develop drug resistance later, and with fatal consequences. But what if doctors could identify those at greatest risk of relapse and provide a therapy to.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Alzheimer"s, Parkinson"s, and Huntington"s diseases share common crucial feature

A study has found that abnormal proteins found in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases share a similar ability to cause damage when they invade brain cells. The finding suggests that an effective treatment for one neurodegenerative dise.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Recreational cocaine: Brain area involved in addiction activated earlier than thought

Even among non-dependent cocaine users, cues associated with consumption of the drug lead to dopamine release in an area of the brain thought to promote compulsive use, according to researchers......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

New piece found in inflammatory disease puzzle

Inflammation is the process by which the body responds to injury or infection but when this process becomes out of control it can cause disease. Researchers have shed light on a key aspect of the process. Their findings may help guide the development.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Discovery of a key regulatory gene in cardiac valve formation

A key regulator gene for the formation of cardiac valves has been identified by researchers, a process crucial to normal embryonic heart development......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Carcinogenic soot particles from petrol engines

First, diesel vehicles tainted their reputation with soot particles, then high nitric oxide emissions. So are owners of new gasoline cars environmentally friendly? Not always, says a new study scientists, some direct-injection gasoline engines emit j.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Genetic mutation trade-offs lead to parallel evolution

Researchers have shown how evolutionary dynamics proceed when selection acts on two traits governed by a trade-off. The results move the life sciences a step closer to understanding the full complexity of evolution at the cellular level......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Does exercise affect the brain"s aging process? New research aims to find out

Most people know that regular exercise can keep a body looking and feeling young. What about the brain? Researchers were recently awarded a two-year grant to further examine the role physical activity plays on the brain......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Regular chocolate consumption may be linked to lower risk of heart flutter

Regular chocolate consumption may be linked to a lower risk of developing the heart rhythm irregularity atrial fibrillation, also known as heart flutter.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Fiber-rich diet linked to lowered risk of painful knee osteoarthritis

A fiber-rich diet is linked to a lowered risk of painful knee osteoarthritis, finds the first study of its kind......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Chondroitin sulfate as good as widely used anti-inflammatory for knee osteoarthritis

High quality (pharmaceutical grade) chondroitin sulfate is as good as a widely prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (celecoxib) for the treatment of painful knee osteoarthritis, concludes new research......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Aging population with care needs set to grow by 25% within a decade in England and Wales

Urgent need for better disease prevention policies targeting poor diet, smoking, alcohol, high blood pressure and physical inactivity, as well as increased investment in health and social care. The number of people aged over 65 years needing care cou.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

U.S.: South highest, Northeast lowest for child auto fatalities

The number of motor vehicle fatalities involving children under age 15 varies widely by state, but occurrences are more common in the South, and are most often associated with improperly or unused restraints and crashes on rural roads, a new review o.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

Largest psoriasis meta-analysis to date yields new genetic clues

The identification of 16 additional genetic markers will help researchers get closer to understanding how -- and why -- psoriasis develops......»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

How polyomavirus tricks our cells into helping it build its invasion route

If every cell in our body is a factory, viruses are industrial spies who try to break in and take over. New findings about how one of the most mysterious types of spy - polyomaviruses -- accomplishes this feat could aid the fight against Merkel cell.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News

New "sperm radar" test may uncover secrets about male infertility

A new technique has been developed to examine human sperm without killing them -- helping to improve the diagnosis of fertility problems. The new test uses Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to examine the molecules in live sperm. Early data suggests it.....»»

Source:  SciencedailyCategory: BiomedMay 25th, 2017Related News